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 What are the first things I should do with my new AR15
ptmccain  [Team Member]
10/31/2010 12:23:55 PM EST
I have a Daniel Defense M4 on order and have been reading for quite a while about the various things I should be doing. I have been poking around here trying to find an essay or article with a check list for:

Congrats, You Own an AR-15: Now what?

But, can't find anything like that.

I know I need to clean the barrel.

I know I need to break in the barrel.

I know I need to sight it.

Anything else?

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Him  [Member]
10/31/2010 1:12:09 PM EST
Sight it in and shoot the friggin thing!

Carry it around with you for at least a week so you "get used to each other."

Did I mention shooting it?
Fugitive  [Member]
10/31/2010 1:14:12 PM EST
Shoot it, then sleep with it.
Captains1911  [Member]
10/31/2010 1:18:43 PM EST
Before shooting you should field strip, clean, inspect, lubricate, and function check. Barrel break-in is not needed, especially for a chrome-lined barrel.

http://www.ar15.com/content/manuals/TM9-1005-319-10.pdf
ptmccain  [Team Member]
10/31/2010 2:23:34 PM EST
Thanks, Captains.

I would sleep with it, but my wife is kind of the jealous sort.

ARJJ  [Team Member]
10/31/2010 3:04:05 PM EST
Captains1911 is on the right track...I field strip a new rifle, clean the chamber and bore to ensure there's no crud in it, and lube it well. Then I take it out and shoot the hell out of it. IME, if it functions 100% on the first 500 rounds, it'll function fine for the life of the rifle.
ptmccain  [Team Member]
10/31/2010 4:54:54 PM EST
Do you follow the break in procedures I have seen around?

Fire 1 shot: clean.
Fire 2nd shot: clean.

etc. etc.
ARJJ  [Team Member]
10/31/2010 5:13:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By ptmccain:
Do you follow the break in procedures I have seen around?

Fire 1 shot: clean.
Fire 2nd shot: clean.

etc. etc.


Heck no!

That might be recommended for a non-chrome lined, precision barrel in a benchrest/target/sniper rifle, but it's a complete waste of time with a chrome-lined barrel in an M4-type carbine. My break-in procedure for an AR carbine is to shoot a case of Brown Bear through it in a range session.
zolojub  [Team Member]
10/31/2010 5:20:34 PM EST
This is relevant to my interests!
ptmccain  [Team Member]
11/1/2010 12:05:31 AM EST
I'm a new AR 15 owner, and have read different opinions about breaking in the barrel on a new weapon.

Wondering what people here have done, and why.

Thanks.
zolojub  [Team Member]
11/1/2010 1:51:56 AM EST
Most people here seem to agree that there is no need for a special break in procedure for an AR. Make sure the weapon is clean and well lubed (I ran mine fairly wet the first time I shot mine) and get her to the range. Give it a good cleaning afterwards and then lubricate a little dryer with just a slight film on the BCG.
Him  [Member]
11/1/2010 5:10:29 AM EST
Break in in a normal AR15 lies somewhere between not necessary and total bullshit.

Just shoot the bloody thing!

Enjoy it, they are harder to break than many would have you think.
Captains1911  [Member]
11/1/2010 5:48:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By ptmccain:
Do you follow the break in procedures I have seen around?

Fire 1 shot: clean.
Fire 2nd shot: clean.

etc. etc.


Search here and elsewhere, as this subject has been covered extensively, and you will find that barrel break-in, even for stainless steel match grade barrels, is a myth. Nobody has ever been able to prove that it does once bit of good. When talking about a chrome-lined barrel, it's even more of a myth.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_LvPjreNjg

http://www.snipercountry.com/articles/barrel_breakin_II.asp
Krylancelo  [Team Member]
11/1/2010 6:37:12 AM EST
This is somewhat of a mimicry of what everyone else has said thus far but here is what I say...

First off, make sure you clean and lubricate the weapon properly. Make sure there's generous amounts of lube on the bolt carrier group, bolt, and cam pin. Make sure you CLEAN the thing thoroughly (but don't go crazy). I always recommend you swab the chamber out and use a chamber brush before you shoot it so you can get out any of the anti-rust oil that they put in there. If you don't get it out, it can cause extraction issues.

After that, shoot the hell out of it. Don't do the shoot and clean between every shot thing. I'm convinced it does virtually nothing unless you're breaking in a very expensive match grade barrel. If you're using a standard chrome-lined barrel, just shoot it. Try to resist the urge (it's hard!) to do mag dumps. Those beat up your barrel. Anything else should be fine.
ptmccain  [Team Member]
11/1/2010 9:10:14 AM EST
Sorry, totally newbie here, if you can't tell.

By mag dump I assume you mean firing as fast as possible, through as many mags as possible.

What is a reasonable way to shoot it?

I mean, one of my local range restricts shot to only every three seconds, etc.

Your advice? Thoughts?
ptmccain  [Team Member]
11/1/2010 9:13:13 AM EST
One more newb question, and yes, I'm willing to be soundly abused for asking, but...

I have hunted around on the 'net for several days trying to find a really great, explicitly detailed, "can not be too dumbed down" instruction set for
lubing and cleaning an AR 15.

Not having much luck.

I would really appreciate any help I can get.

The downside of mail order is I can't just walk it into my local gunshop and say, "OK, I didn't buy this from you, but can you show me how to disassemble it, clean it and lube it?"

Thanks guys for any help you can offer.

Ironmaker  [Team Member]
11/1/2010 9:27:21 AM EST
Originally Posted By ptmccain:
Do you follow the break in procedures I have seen around?

Fire 1 shot: clean.
Fire 2nd shot: clean.

etc. etc.


I did this on my first AR 10 years ago, but not on any of the numerous rifles since.

Just shoot it.
Captains1911  [Member]
11/1/2010 10:36:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By ptmccain:
One more newb question, and yes, I'm willing to be soundly abused for asking, but...

I have hunted around on the 'net for several days trying to find a really great, explicitly detailed, "can not be too dumbed down" instruction set for
lubing and cleaning an AR 15.

Not having much luck.

I would really appreciate any help I can get.

The downside of mail order is I can't just walk it into my local gunshop and say, "OK, I didn't buy this from you, but can you show me how to disassemble it, clean it and lube it?"

Thanks guys for any help you can offer.



Did you not see the resource I provided in my first post of this thread?

On a separate note, even if you did buy the rifle from a local store, chances are you're better off not taking their advice.
Krylancelo  [Team Member]
11/1/2010 12:06:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By Captains1911:
Originally Posted By ptmccain:
One more newb question, and yes, I'm willing to be soundly abused for asking, but...

I have hunted around on the 'net for several days trying to find a really great, explicitly detailed, "can not be too dumbed down" instruction set for
lubing and cleaning an AR 15.

Not having much luck.

I would really appreciate any help I can get.

The downside of mail order is I can't just walk it into my local gunshop and say, "OK, I didn't buy this from you, but can you show me how to disassemble it, clean it and lube it?"

Thanks guys for any help you can offer.



Did you not see the resource I provided in my first post of this thread?

On a separate note, even if you did buy the rifle from a local store, chances are you're better off not taking their advice.

Unfortunately, this is the sad truth most of the time. Many gun store employees don't know jack about the guns they sell or how to properly clean or maintain them.

As far as cleaning, most owners manuals are a good start. The resource that Captains1911 linked is also very good. I would read that through a few times.

Mag dumps are shooting a magazine very quickly and not really trying for accuracy, just the fun of shooting quickly. It is damn fun but it can beat on your barrel a bit. Doing one here or there is fine just don't do like 3-4 in a row, that can cause some wear since the barrel will get very hot. "Normal" shooting is probably one shot every 2-5 seconds. I forget the exact number but I believe (and feel free to correct me) that the standard government profile (m4 profile) barrel is rated to fire 20 shots per minute indefinitely without becoming damaged. That's 1 shot every 3 seconds. Heavier profile barrels can handle the heat better and can be fired a bit faster.


ARJJ  [Team Member]
11/1/2010 2:57:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By ptmccain:
One more newb question, and yes, I'm willing to be soundly abused for asking, but...

I have hunted around on the 'net for several days trying to find a really great, explicitly detailed, "can not be too dumbed down" instruction set for
lubing and cleaning an AR 15.

Not having much luck.

I would really appreciate any help I can get.

The downside of mail order is I can't just walk it into my local gunshop and say, "OK, I didn't buy this from you, but can you show me how to disassemble it, clean it and lube it?"

Thanks guys for any help you can offer.



In case you missed it earlier: M16/M4 Operator's Manual

Just shoot the thing. Rapid fire, slow fire, mag dumps, who cares?

ptmccain  [Team Member]
11/2/2010 4:39:55 AM EST
Thanks.
JRBL1A1  [Member]
11/4/2010 6:45:49 PM EST
Originally Posted By ptmccain:
Do you follow the break in procedures I have seen around?

Fire 1 shot: clean.
Fire 2nd shot: clean.

etc. etc.


There is no need to do THAT amount of cleaning with a new AR15 rifle. If you had a new custom rifle then perhaps, but not with a standard ARx. Simply do a a brush or 2 through the bore, maybe a very light coat of oil, lube up the internals of the receivers, the bolt carrier group, and go slow for the first few 20 rounds or so and make sure she works good and smooth.

BE SAFE and HAVE FUN!
DansFlash  [Team Member]
11/9/2010 4:22:34 PM EST
Get it out of the box and clean it and then lube it. Then shoot the crap out of it. Then clean it and store it until your next outing.
Essayons  [Team Member]
11/9/2010 4:35:00 PM EST
Gunsterbate...
















Seriously, sight it in and shoot the shit out of it.
fammyman  [Team Member]
11/9/2010 4:50:28 PM EST
no one has said throw it down the driveway yet
Melendez402  [Member]
11/10/2010 6:31:10 AM EST
If you dont know jack about it I say read the manual, then clean it and shoot the hell out of it.
Cliffyy  [Team Member]
11/10/2010 8:48:55 AM EST
Shoot it till you run out of ammo. Clean. Then buy some more and keep shooting.
Isenhelm  [Team Member]
11/10/2010 10:56:27 AM EST
buy ammo and cleaning supplies, sight in, shoot shoot shoot shoot
get a good 500 rounds or more through it and then take a carbine class.
Blindman62  [Member]
11/13/2010 11:47:04 AM EST
Originally Posted By Cliffyy:
Shoot it till you run out of ammo. Clean. Then buy some more and keep shooting.


+1 on this. One thing you will learn is that if you ask 5 people for an opinion on the 'net, you will get hundreds. Many of them will come from posers that have never even handled a weapon. There is an unimagineable amount of misinformation on the 'net. You will soon learn who on this site speaks the truth.
I'd never been around an AR before June and the guys here led me through assembling my own Frankengun.
The most important thing you must learn is 1, Learn who to listen to, who gives the advice that sounds the most reasonable to you. Then you can start separating the knowledge from the BS.
2, Learn to ask viable intelligent questions. Think it out first, go to search. If you still can't figure it out, then ask your question.
Find someone in your circle of friends that has some AR experience, and talk to them. If they try to BS you, find new friends.
But most important of all, HAVE FUN!! This isn't rocket science,it's a hobby. Mike
.
winddummy82  [Team Member]
11/25/2010 2:11:28 AM EST
Originally Posted By Krylancelo:
This is somewhat of a mimicry of what everyone else has said thus far but here is what I say...

First off, make sure you clean and lubricate the weapon properly. Make sure there's generous amounts of lube on the bolt carrier group, bolt, and cam pin. Make sure you CLEAN the thing thoroughly (but don't go crazy). I always recommend you swab the chamber out and use a chamber brush before you shoot it so you can get out any of the anti-rust oil that they put in there. If you don't get it out, it can cause extraction issues.

After that, shoot the hell out of it. Don't do the shoot and clean between every shot thing. I'm convinced it does virtually nothing unless you're breaking in a very expensive match grade barrel. If you're using a standard chrome-lined barrel, just shoot it. Try to resist the urge (it's hard!) to do mag dumps. Those beat up your barrel. Anything else should be fine.


this guy gets it!
oscar615  [Member]
1/7/2011 9:10:46 AM EST
This link(posted earlier) was a real eye opener. I suggest reading this article.

http://www.snipercountry.com/articles/barrel_breakin_II.asp

AK_Steve  [Member]
1/8/2011 10:41:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By ptmccain:
One more newb question, and yes, I'm willing to be soundly abused for asking, but...

I have hunted around on the 'net for several days trying to find a really great, explicitly detailed, "can not be too dumbed down" instruction set for
lubing and cleaning an AR 15.

Not having much luck.

I would really appreciate any help I can get.

The downside of mail order is I can't just walk it into my local gunshop and say, "OK, I didn't buy this from you, but can you show me how to disassemble it, clean it and lube it?"

Thanks guys for any help you can offer.



Here are two great resources that I refer to when lubricating my rifles. They include information about lube points that aren't as commonly known as others.

Keep It Running.pdf

Lubrication of the AR15
FMJ  [Team Member]
1/11/2011 7:28:18 AM EST
When I buy a Rack grade M4
I test it out 500rds then the next day another 500.
I clean / Break in Combat AR15 different than I would a High end Match grade AR15
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