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 What's the date stamp on your Yugo brass 7.62x39?
pistoleroar15  [Member]
6/3/2011 9:21:55 AM EST
I'd like to start this topic by reporting I just received yesterday a few 40rd boxes on stripper clips from Widener's with what I assume is April 1972 (stamped "7204-08" on the box. "1972" on the rounds).

I've become fascinated by this Yugo ammo since it's true military surplus,brass- not steel cases, and usually offered in their original sealed cases. Since I'm a military history buff, this is all the more intriguing for me. All this makes this ammo an exceptional breed, considering what we've seen on the market for the last 20+ years. Except for having corrosive primers, it is widely acknowledged to be high quality fodder. All the stuff I've seen looks like it was produced this year. If you opened up your cases, did yours also look like this?

I'm doing this date stamp check with you all for us to get a better idea of its history. Trying

What do your boxes (or cases) have for a date on them? In 15rd boxes or 40rd boxes on strippers? Which distributor (if known) did you get it from? When?

If you bought it on stripper clips, did you buy it to load into an SKS or/and to load using stripper clip guide into AK magazines? Both for me, by the way.

Are you storing in original military cases for SHTF? I have six 1120 rd sealed cases (in strippers) I bought from the Armory last month plus about about another 400+ rds loose from both Widener's recently and Cope's Distributing last year for SHTF stashed away. The cases are dated 1980. I didn't want to wait any longer to stock up because I don't know when the supply will dry up. I know they imported many millions of rounds, but they made a certain amount and that's it. So many times on forums like this I've read other people talking about getting ammo "back in the day" that was so plentiful and a fraction of what's being charged now. I didn't want to regret missing out on this one. Besides, even if the supply in the market lasts a long time, there are still the issues of changes in currency values, transportation costs, and any unforseen events in the future to consider. The Armory sold out of their stock about a week after I got my cases from them. They haven't restocked since then. Stock has been spotty with AIM for about the last month or so and Cope's has been out for months, I believe. I 've purchased ammo from them, too. They're all GTG IMHO

How many of these rounds are you shooting off and how many are you stashing away?

Any other background information anyone might have on this interesting ammo would be appreciated.

Thanks for playing.

P
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1Devildog  [Member]
6/3/2011 9:38:09 AM EST
The Yugos started making 7.62x39mm in 1965. The first three years used the Soviet style steel core porjectile. In 1967 they adopted the lead core M-67 style ball projectile. Since steel core can no longer be imported, you are not likely to see any Yugo dated 1965, 1966 or 1967. Other than that, just about every year has turned up at one time or another, right up to the early 1990's IIRC. I regularly see 60's, 70's and 80's dates on the brass I pick up at the range...

It is excellent military grade ammo, but the corrosiveprimers scare some folks off...

1DD
pistoleroar15  [Member]
6/3/2011 10:45:41 AM EST
Yes, corrosive primers scared me off for a long time, too. I originally bought a few 15rd boxes just for my cartridge collection. But after reading extensively on the gun forums about cleaning up after corrosive primed ammo I felt confident enough to take the plunge. Besides, I have no intention of shooting this ammo recreationally, only for SHTF storage. I have a bunch of S&B steel cased non-corrosive stuff I bought back in 1995 that I can burn off at the range.

Come to think of it, since my corrosive Yugo ammo is only for SHTF storage, I should store a few large refill bottles of Windex with the ammo for cleaning the inside components of my guns, just in case. It might turn out to be a simple, but valuable investment just in case the S does HTF.
thecreeper23  [Team Member]
6/3/2011 5:16:55 PM EST
I've had '71, '79 and '83 Yugo surplus.

All bought at various times from AIM.

EDIT: There was also a box of '84 in there.
emmetf  [Member]
6/3/2011 6:00:39 PM EST
To the original poster, your ammo was manufactured in April 1972, Lot #8 for that month, at that particular Factory (either Bosnian or Serbian). I am by no means a serious collector but I've seen Yugoslavian M67 ammo dated from the very early 1970's to the very late 1980's, with the actual cartridge head-stamp dated as late as 1989, from ammo loaded in what was then Macedonia. I'm afraid anything else dated AFTER around 1990 or so was actually used in the various conflicts and Civil Wars that followed in the former-Yugoslavia. From what I've read, everything that's coming in now is from stores left over in Bosnia and Croatia. Whether we will ever actually see anything surplus from Serbia proper, who knows?

You really should take the time to actually shoot at least a handful of boxes from whatever rifle you own. You owe it to yourself to see just how well this ammo shoots. You will be impressed. As long as you do a quick clean at the range with whatever you have on hand (Hoppe's or water/Windex), you will see no issues with regards to corrosion. It's really not that bad, clean well and shoot some more! Good luck.

StealthCRF  [Team Member]
6/3/2011 9:19:30 PM EST
83...
Racecar_Guy  [Team Member]
6/5/2011 6:48:46 PM EST
40rd on strippers. 1984. Aim Surplus
dharbolt  [Member]
6/8/2011 11:18:48 AM EST
40 round stripper clips 2 cases '77 from AIM
thecreeper23  [Team Member]
6/10/2011 4:04:04 PM EST
Picked up another case from AIM. Crate is marked 87.
gene_wi  [Team Member]
6/16/2011 7:29:14 AM EST
Just got a lot with stamp 1993 from AIM.
pistoleroar15  [Member]
6/16/2011 8:04:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By gene_wi:
Just got a lot with stamp 1993 from AIM.


Wow 1993! I was under the impression that they ran the military 7.62x39 from about 1960 to 1989.

That's interesting. That means they made this ammo even after the outbreak of hostilities in the former Yugoslavia in 1992.

Great feedback ,people. Please keep it coming. I consider this version of 7.62x39 ammo to be one of the more interesting in recent memory.

1Devildog  [Member]
6/16/2011 9:06:54 AM EST
The latest date in my checklist is from PPU showing manufacture in 1994. I know Igman and Prvi made ammunition since then. The question is how you want to classify this ammunition. When did Yugoslavia dissolve and become seperate entities? When Bosnia-Herzegovina and Serbia continued production of this caliber, Igman and Prvi respectively, it was to the same specs. Is it still "Yugo" ammunition?

1DD
pistoleroar15  [Member]
6/17/2011 8:35:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By 1Devildog:
The latest date in my checklist is from PPU showing manufacture in 1994. I know Igman and Prvi made ammunition since then. The question is how you want to classify this ammunition. When did Yugoslavia dissolve and become seperate entities? When Bosnia-Herzegovina and Serbia continued production of this caliber, Igman and Prvi respectively, it was to the same specs. Is it still "Yugo" ammunition?

1DD

I see what you're saying. The ammo I'm interested in getting date stamps from is what's been packaged in the "tins" inside the wooden crate. I definately classify this as military issue ammo.

Come to think of it, I wonder if the former Yugoslavian countries still officially use rifles in 7.62x39, and, if they do, if they still produce it in brass casings with the same type of bullet and packaging in tins, wood (or other material) crates, etc. And is it still being made with corrosive primers?

It keeps getting more interesting.
1Devildog  [Member]
6/17/2011 2:04:14 PM EST
I checked in with some collectors. nny with dates as late as 2006 are known. nny 1999 and 2002 have turned up in Iraq... No reason to expect the packaging has changed much over the years.


1DD
M4Michael  [Member]
6/22/2011 2:15:35 PM EST
Just received a 1260 case from AIM - 6/94
jrken1  [Member]
6/22/2011 3:42:53 PM EST
Last 1250 rounds marked 1979..... Current box is marked 1984 .... both from Aim Surplus.
DK18  [Member]
6/23/2011 5:05:26 AM EST
Originally Posted By M4Michael:
Just received a 1260 case from AIM - 6/94


I just got a 1260 case from AIM 6/94 also
MedicAJ  [Member]
6/24/2011 6:10:35 AM EST
So, if the SKS strippers don't reliably work to load AK mags, WHY were they still packaging the ammunition on the strippers in the late 80's? Just curious...
thecreeper23  [Team Member]
6/24/2011 7:48:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By MedicAJ:
So, if the SKS strippers don't reliably work to load AK mags, WHY were they still packaging the ammunition on the strippers in the late 80's? Just curious...


Likely because the Yugo SKS was their national reserve defense weapon. Pics of the bosnian conflict show lots of SKS rifles in use during the 1990s.
ColonelHurtz  [Team Member]
6/29/2011 11:14:54 AM EST
No stripper case from AIM, 1988.
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